Abstract
Year 2021
October 2021

SHBC1410

Abstract Title
Nicotine dependence in patients with major depressive disorder and psychotic disorders and its relationship with quality of life.
Authors

P.WANG1, E.ABDIN1, P.V.ASHARANI1, V.SEET1, Y.Y.LEE1, F.DEVI1, K.ROYSTONN1, L.CETTY1, W.L.TEH1, S.K.VERMA1, Y.M.MOK1, M.SUBRAMANIAM1

Institutions

Institute of Mental Health1

Background & Hypothesis

The aim of the current study was to examine the associations between nicotine dependence (ND) and quality of life (QOL) among the psychiatric population. There is a lack of knowledge on how varying levels of ND affects QOL.

Methods

Participants (n=378) diagnosed with either major depressive disorder or psychotic disorder were recruited from IMH. Fagerstorm Test for Nicotine Dependence was used to measure the level of ND. SF-12 health survey questionnaire was used to measure QOL. This scale includes 12 items covering 8 domains and 2 summary scores. The Physical Component Score (PCS) and the Mental Component Score (MCS) are summary scores. Multiple linear regression was used.

Results

The prevalence of ND was 23.3%. Ever-smokers with low (β=2.56, p=0.035) or moderate (β=2.90, p=0.047) levels of ND reported better QOL in the domain of PCS as compared to non-smokers. Compared to non-smokers, ever-smokers with high ND were associated with poorer Role-Physical (RP) (β=-5.35, p=0.014), Role-Emotional (RE) (β=-8.87, p=0.001), Mental Health (MH) (β=-5.11, p=0.03) and MCS (β=-6.96, p=0.005).

Discussion & Conclusion

The prevalence of ND in this psychiatric population is 7 times higher than the general population. While lower levels of ND might be associated with better QOL, patients must be cautioned about the long-term physical complications of smoking. Ever-smokers with high ND have poorer health outcomes in various domains which may be due to smoking-related disease. Our findings provide inputs for better understanding of ND and for developing interventions for smoking cessation.

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